Zach Caronna

Zach Caronna Patron

Favorite films

  • It's a Wonderful Life
  • Oasis
  • It's Such a Beautiful Day
  • Godzilla

Recent activity

All
  • Night and Fog

    ★★★★★

  • Turning Red

    ★★★★½

  • Dune

    ★★★★½

  • The Good, The Bad, The Weird

    ★★★★

Recent reviews

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  • Night and Fog

    Night and Fog

    ★★★★★

    It only takes one image to scar the mind, and Alain Resnais’ documentary – a half-hour timeline depicting the context, rise, and process of the Nazis’ concentration camps – has many more than one capable of forever imprinting itself on the hippocampus. Even knowing what to expect doesn’t help, and the rapidity with which we advance from the development of the camps to the extermination of prisoners makes the final 10 minutes feel like a pummeling under the wheels of…

  • Turning Red

    Turning Red

    ★★★★½

    Turning Red is definitely a unique film in the Pixar cannon. It’s their first feature to be directed by a woman and third (in a row) to be directed by a person of color, and neither feels like a demographic check-in-the-box. Rather than making unfamiliar worlds rich with recognizable details, as is the studio’s norm, this feels like the life-experience of a person translated to screen with the same level of incredible success. It’s odd to think of Pixar having…

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  • Dune

    Dune

    ★★★★½

    Now three years removed from my first viewings, I’m finding more to admire about this unique blockbuster. Dune is undoubtedly an introductory film in the vein of The Fellowship of the Ring, and its more methodical pacing and broader scope hinder the catharsis of completion by film’s end provided by Peter Jackson’s beloved first installment. But Dune is not an incomplete film. It may leave off on a cliffhanger, but it clearly defines its central character and his growth while…

  • Oppenheimer

    Oppenheimer

    ★★★★½

    Nolan’s films use music as a means of establishing propulsion during exposition and intensity to spectacle. In both respects, and with all due respect Hans Zimmerman, Ludwig Göransson’s musical score is possibly the most beautiful and effective accompaniment to one of Chris’ films. “Can You Hear the Music” is a gorgeous exercise in transforming violins into a weapon of mass destruction. The violin couples with the grey-blue-and-brown color palette, suits, and wood to provide a rich intellectual atmosphere

    Oppenheimer is…