Favorite films

  • U.S. Go Home
  • La Haine
  • Ikiru
  • The Passion of Joan of Arc

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  • Aguirre, the Wrath of God

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  • The Empty Man

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  • Phantom Thread

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  • There Will Be Blood

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  • Aguirre, the Wrath of God

    Aguirre, the Wrath of God

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    We begin with a symphonic chorus, pan down from the clouds to the lush greenness of the Amazonian landscape to see our band of explorers, wholly inorganic, struggling step-by-step down the treacherous path to darkness. In Herzog's Aguirre, the Wrath of God we are treated to a physical, psychological, and spiritual trial of man that is as powerful as it is unnerving. Delivering a more quiet and contemplative vision than I expected, this film expertly explores the hubris of man…

  • The Empty Man

    The Empty Man

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    This horror flick starts with a real bang but sadly ends in a confused fizzle. Where the imagery, the horror, and the setting of the prologue is as clear, simple, and terrifyingly crisp as the thin Bhutanese air where we meet our opening quartet, the last half of the film spirals away from classic horror opting for more mystery and thriller, losing its edge.

    Don’t get me wrong, this film has its moments. The performances, the cinematography, and the scares…

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  • Candyman

    Candyman

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    Nia DaCosta's Candyman offers up a sequel to the 1992 classic that is bound to provide a good argument over dinner or drinks post-screening. I'll start by saying that I enjoyed myself. I liked the slickness of the camerawork, the performances, and, however heavy-handed, appreciated the commentary on race and institutionalized police violence.

    While I do feel the need to say I enjoyed myself, and I really did enjoy myself, I also find myself stuck dwelling on those aspects that…

  • Phantom Thread

    Phantom Thread

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    Paul Thomas Anderson's most recent film is one of his most measured, sincere, and diabolically romantic. It is shot beautifully, written and performed wonderfully, and comes together like a perfectly tailored suit.

    This film has an earthiness to it that is rooted in the power play we see between two people and two spaces: the city (Daniel Day-Lewis) and the country (Vicky Krieps). With elements of There Will Be Blood and Punch-Drunk Love PTA crafts a semi-macabre romance that delves…