The Film Foundation

Created in 1990 by Martin Scorsese, The Film Foundation (TFF) is dedicated to protecting and preserving motion picture history. By working in partnership with archives and studios, the…

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Join us for a free online double-feature screening of Robert Siodmak's THE KILLERS (1946) and Don Siegel's THE KILLERS (1964).

It's screening for free, July 8th - July 11th in The Restoration Screening Room

Register at the link below:

passes.delphiquest.com/the-killers

The second screen adaptation of Hemingway’s story was also the first movie ever made for television. Don Siegel’s 1964 version of THE KILLERS differs greatly from Siodmak’s in both tone and temperament. It’s shot in vibrant color and from the…

Join us for a free online double-feature screening of Robert Siodmak's THE KILLERS (1946) and Don Siegel's THE KILLERS (1964).

It's screening for free, July 8th - July 11th in The Restoration Screening Room

Register at the link below:

passes.delphiquest.com/the-killers

THE KILLERS, the first screen adaption of Ernest Hemingway’s deceptively short story, is a terrifying and taut film noir, one that would not only help create the genre but also come to define it. The iconic opening diner scene, filled…

Join us March 11-14th for a FREE online screening of our restoration of Abraham Polonsky's FORCE OF EVIL:

passes.delphiquest.com/march-double-feature

FORCE OF EVIL, moving like a runaway train, follows the unscrupulous scheming of New York lawyer Joe Morse (John Garfield). By consolidating a numbers racket, Joe has the unseemly opportunity to make it big by teaming up with ruthless gangster Ben Tucker (Roy Roberts). The only hindrance to this plan is Joe's brother, Leo (Thomas Gomez), who refuses to implicate his…

Join us March 11-14th for a FREE online screening of our restoration of Max Ophul's CAUGHT:

passes.delphiquest.com/march-double-feature

CAUGHT is the third film the great Max Ophüls would make in America and it's a dramatic and sometimes terrifying examination of domestic life in the 1940s. He makes the most of his terrific cast—James Mason, Barbara Bel Geddes, and Robert Ryan—to tell the story of a young fashion model who falls in love too quickly and soon finds herself a prisoner in…

When Roberto Rossellini was making his film Francesco, Giullare di Dio, he cast non-actors in every role (with the exception of Aldo Fabrizi as the invader Nicolaio). Francis and his followers were all played by Franciscan friars and novices, one of whom told Rossellini that he was a poet. “I asked him what kind of poetry he was doing,” said Rossellini in a 1971 Film Culture interview, quoted in Tag Gallagher’s definitive critical biography, The Adventures of Roberto Rossellini. “He…

In today’s New York Times—a newspaper with a sad history of treating the arts like a cat’s toy—we are served yet another slice of baby talk in the guise of a cultural “think piece.” “Great is what this art is,” goes the sub-hed of a reflection on the Gardner Museum’s new Titian exhibition, “yet it raises doubts about whether any art, however ‘great,’ can be considered exempt from moral scrutiny.”

What art has ever been “considered exempt from moral scrutiny?”…

24 years ago, I was thumbing through a copy of Cahiers du Cinéma and came across an item on a low budget ($50,000 to be exact) first film called Xiao Wu by a young Chinese director named Jia Zhangke. I was intrigued, because the description of Xiao Wu seemed wholly different from the Fifth Generation films of Chen Kaige, Zhang Yimou, or even Tian Zhuangzhuang. The film made its way through the international film festival circuit, first appearing in Berlin,…

Il Bidone, recently restored by The Film Foundation and the Cineteca di Bologna at L’Immagine Ritrovata, in collaboration with Titanus, has always been considered one of Federico Fellini’s “minor” works. True enough, I guess. Just as Poor Folk is “minor” Dostoyevsky and Pericles “minor” Shakespeare: when you’re in territory that exalted, the word “minor” ceases to be of much use.

Il Bidone started life as a picaresque comedy about Italian swindlers in the key of Lubitsch, inspired by real con…