Favorite films

  • Singin' in the Rain
  • Mulholland Drive
  • Bringing Up Baby
  • Before Sunrise

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  • RRR

    ★★★★

  • Deep Water

    ★★

  • Devi

    ★★★★★

  • Pikoo

    ★★★½

Recent reviews

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  • RRR

    RRR

    ★★★★

    So audacious in parts that I was gasping with delight and awe. It functions simultaneously as Hollywood parody and earnest action flick, throwing everything at the screen and it almost all sticks, making a kaleidoscopic majesty out of beautiful movie stars (HELLO, Ram Chadian), hokey CGI, terrible British accents, absurdly imaginative stunts and a classic narrative of righteous revenge. RRR sounds chaotic, but it’s evident in the craft that it has been so carefully, purposefully made to hit every mark and earn every cheer.

    🎞 Prince Charles Cinema, London

  • Deep Water

    Deep Water

    ★★

    Takes the ‘erotic’ out of ‘erotic thriller’. Deep Water seems well-cast - Ben Affleck refracting his cuck husband from Gone Girl; Hollywood’s new it-girl Ana de Armas caressing every man she meets - but there’s no steam, no danger, no intrigue. Patricia Highsmith deserves better.

    📺 Amazon Prime

Popular reviews

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  • Liberal Arts

    Liberal Arts

    ★½

    This review may contain spoilers. I can handle the truth.

    This is the kind of wistful auburn drama that's so easy to watch, you feel harsh pointing out everything that's wrong with it. But it's so aware of being that kind of film, to the extent that the first piece of classical music that plays from Elizabeth Olsen's mixtape gift to Josh Radnor, soundtracking his journey back out of the rosy green backwoods of Ohio, is Beethoven's 'Pastoral' symphony. It's so deeply aware of itself that this mixtape becomes the…

  • Weekend

    Weekend

    ★★★★★

    A modern masterpiece. Andrew Haigh’s filmmaking effortlessly conveys the interior struggles of an emblematic but precise individual (Tom Cullen is exceptional) and how he feels adjacent to society, comfortable in himself but not in how the world treats him and what he represents to others. It also paints an intimate picture of British gay life, and while the technology and the spaces have developed and changed in the interim, the depth of feeling still rings painfully, melancholically, gorgeously true.