Evangelion: 3.0 You Can (Not) Redo

Evangelion: 3.0 You Can (Not) Redo

Each Evangelion Rebuild film has departed more and more from the series canon. What began as a consolidation has been revealed as an altogether unique construction. Up to this point, EVANGELION: 2.0 represented an ideal synthesis for me in its interweaving of old and new material. I thought that was the intention, so I accepted it on those grounded terms. But I should've guessed there would be no set reference point for what came next. I wasn't ready for anything more ambitious. EVANGELION: 3.0 defied my assumptions so radically that I couldn't keep up for a while. Only after I took a break from watching and resumed could I accept this strange new mutation in the series canon.

But then it's ridiculous to expect a stable 'canon' from Evangelion, a multimedia creation that is forever re-combining its fragments of accumulated lore. THE END OF EVANGELION was itself a gigantic retcon that charted astounding new paths for Anno's original framework. Even these newer attempts to 'conclude' the series sprawl into infinitude, generating their own tantalizing fractals in contradiction to stated aims. Evangelion 'began' in 1995 and it has still yet to 'end' in 2018. EVANGELION 4.0 should finally arrive in 2019/2020, but can Evangelion itself ever really end? It is expected nowadays for media franchises to continue mining profit from their IP indefinitely, yet Evangelion seems to invert that formulation: it is constantly 'ending,' constantly promising closure, only to find that there's much more to be said, thought, and felt.

Evangelion is almost as old as I am, and just as I don't expect my own life's end to be determined in advance, Evangelion is still living out its own peculiar lifespan. Surrounded as I am by innumerable undead media properties, I find uncanny solace in this one that insists upon its own vitality. For the time being, I believe it. And I accept it.

Post1000Tension liked this review