• Our House

    Our House

    ★★★★

    Watch it as it burns out (it is just a flame). The boundaries left undiscovered, of a spatial; writhing life from a student of Kiyoshi Kurosawa (let's all look out for Yui Kiyohara). These vague ambiguities can be absolutely frustrating; Though, something in one's eyes can realize that there could be a shining transparency in portrait windows and ethereal configurations of life. Season-less. Dancing with the unknown song. We the waves... are giving.

  • After This Our Exile

    After This Our Exile

    ★★★★★

    The end of eternal longing. After many years, the mentor of Wong Kar-wai came back to direct again. When there is an abrupt cut and visual cinematography in a Patrick Tam Kar-Ming film, there is an emotion; a reaction that some viewers could feel, literal and/or within the texture, leading to a realization, complex like an abstraction. He did this through a snap in rage, a victory, a sword, a rom-com, a beach, a gun; a youth no longer without…

  • Terror of Yakuza

    Terror of Yakuza

    ★★★★

    Bullet vacations. Grand scales in common running times is suited for those who favor early bites and actioner strikes. The late Sonny Chiba, his presence breaks all glass and mayhem. Rifles on ski boats. Vehicles on burning chases. Wish the crew the deadly farewells.

  • Radio City Fantasy

    Radio City Fantasy

    ★★★★½

    Soyokaze Apartment 201. Where will you signal your love songs? For the backdrop of true textures. OVA (original video anime) on the concept album, visual; emotional near-overload. It's in the wavelength. The entire body is an eye on the first meeting. Cities on you. Now, if only I had the lyrics to the songs played on this to study this even further. Essence. Deafening.

  • Monday

    Monday

    ★★★★★

    The absurdity of vengeance? You will see drunken colors; figures that you saw a while back. Surrealed up. You will see everything you never expected. The SABU conceptual errors at their most electric. Silly spirits (hahaha).

  • Otakus in Love

    Otakus in Love

    ★★★½

    MANGA SICK. Nerd's love or the graphic novel romance. Did you know the soul of the shared arts? The heartfelt in the absurdist romantic comedies? The charmful animated special effects? Or the manga drawings that make their cosplayers? To those who prefer the cover of Wave of Mutilation by Number Girl over the original by the Pixies, I know who you are... (but you're still cool though, haha)

  • Ryusui-kaen

    Ryusui-kaen

    ★★★★

    Wonders of metamorphosis (kanji, humans, creatures, animals; shimmering).

  • Out of the Dark

    Out of the Dark

    ★★★

    The Maltesers professional. Scaffold biting. Though there are splatter, slasher and haunted house slapsticks to be found, these have a range of genuine absurd hilarity to trying too hard to be funny to low-brow and tasteless. There's barely any timing for the jokes, like pies thrown on top of the already pie-splattered faces. The chance for being tired is high, but it's never boring.

  • Kazuo Umezu's Horror Theater: Bug's House

    Kazuo Umezu's Horror Theater: Bug's House

    ★★★½

    The roles of the bugs: crawling, sitting (on walls; floors) and occasional feeding times. Mysterious changes with no reliance. Formal densities for TV. Relationship cage (a Kiyoshi Kurosawa-directed episode of the Kazuo Umezu’s Horror Theater anthology series).

  • The Revenge: A Visit from Fate

    The Revenge: A Visit from Fate

    ★★★★

    Dr. Innocuous-Ketamoid. Kiyoshi Kurosawa takes the deconstruction of action route, when it lacks in vivid philosophy, it contains raw Kitano sleepy un-thrills. The cool Sho Aikawa image is stripped down. Through the warehouse pillars. Blunt bullets. The silencer made of contemplation.

  • Have You Seen the Barefoot God?

    Have You Seen the Barefoot God?

    ★★★★½

    Youth confusion in unison. The mirror is a window. Angst. Religious beliefs. Literature's artistry. "Have you touched your eyes? Have you seen it's eyes?" ...no one replied from the glaciers. Everything remains natural. Stiff.

  • Unknown Child

    Unknown Child

    ★★★

    Recounting Shunji Iwai's first dream (his short film debut). Counting your children like in the ways the herds jumped over the fence. The core members of the family. He hasn't adapted his scale-texture formalities yet, so this short is brought down especially with the occasional amateurish technicalities, though one could wonder and anticipate the nights where he would try to make a better celluloid dream (film).