Patrik Sandberg

“Scraping C-List Celebrities Off The Sidewalk Like Gum” - anonymous commenter

Favorite films

  • Showgirls
  • The Hunger
  • Eyes of Laura Mars
  • Casino

Recent activity

All
  • Fire of Love

    ★★★★★

  • Lenny

    ★★★★★

  • Lightyear

    ★★★★

  • Elvis

    ★★★

Recent reviews

More
  • Lenny

    Lenny

    ★★★★★

    Fosse’s fluency in intimacy and performance never ceases to astonish. The notion of theatricality, often metastasized as a dirty word, is given new vocabulary in his films. You see which elements he selectively translates to screen: the verisimilitude of an audience, the close details of the hushed interaction, the fidgets and micro-diversions, what he must have noticed in countless theaters…the subtlest antics that could thrust a performer into self-doubt. His claustrophobic observation of a sweaty, unsure Bruce, the alternately grandiose…

  • Elvis

    Elvis

    ★★★

    The grit is scrubbed shiny, the darkness skimmed over, the edges smoothed out, and the vascular details obliterated into green screen sparkles. Or drowned in CG focus shifts that blur the transitions between places, settings, and years. The cleverly applied spliced-in found footage fails to lend a patina of history by serving to illuminate how aesthetically discomfiting the green screen mise-en-scene is in the rest of the picture. But this movie, which is more like a 3 hour montage, is…

Popular reviews

More
  • jeen-yuhs: A Kanye Trilogy

    jeen-yuhs: A Kanye Trilogy

    ★★★★★

    PART 1:

    Radiant, ecstatic, vérité work that can only come from a second-nature reflex on the part of the directors. The durational nature gives a rare “all-along” backstage account of an artist—as singular as we’ll ever see—as he plots his own meteoric rise, unleashing his nascent talent casually in unexpected bursts. Spellbounding, sobering, emotional cinema. I can’t wait to see the next two installments.

    Watched at AMC Sunset 5.


    PARTS 2&3:
    Watching the making of “Through the Wire” was a…

  • Zola

    Zola

    ★★★★

    A vérité celluloid drift in place of a neon-drenched spree, Janicza Bravo directs Zola with the wry desolation that defined a certain brand of idiosyncratic, independent, director-driven comedies of the 1990s, only updated for the iPhone generation. It’s a starkly confident choice that pays off consistently, as often as the writing defies expectations. I was taken with Bravo’s perspective, the way she makes big moments small and small moments big, and yet despite some necessary mocking, keeps all her characters…