• Bullet Train

    Bullet Train

    ★★★

    Even if it is carried with great gusto and élan and is entertaining enough to pass the time, Bullet Train is ultimately a shoehorned collection of things we’ve already seen, albeit with cleverly staged fight sequences and Brad Pitt as The Dude but if he were an assassin, while riding on a plot that drags things on past the point where I stopped caring about what was happening.

  • Terrifier

    Terrifier

    ★★

    Art is perhaps the funniest and scariest killer clown there will ever be, but it seems Leone doesn’t understand that no amount of gore can make up for the absurdities of the film’s plot and lack of substance. If it weren’t for all the hype surrounding Terrifier 2, I wouldn’t have wasted my time with this boring, mindless, schlocky B-movie torture porn.

  • Nope

    Nope

    ★★★½

    Peele is firing on all cylinders in the technical department, and like Us, this film is harder to digest and more thought-provoking than Get Out, even though that remains his most accomplished work—with a wholly satisfying and riveting final act. And although Nope may be his most ambitious feat yet, it is far from the Spielbergian spectacle it aims to be, and his sensibilities here lean heavily toward both homage and innovation while still missing a meaty core, as his narrative…

  • All Hallows' Eve

    All Hallows' Eve

    ★★½

    Despite its distractingly amateurish execution and scattershot pacing that drags the film on for longer than necessary, Damien Leone shows promise behind the camera, and Art the Clown is as deliciously sadistic, charming, and demonic as you could hope for a killer clown to be—most certainly a horror icon in the making.

  • Crimes of the Future

    Crimes of the Future

    ★★½

    The master of body horror himself returns to his roots with a socio-political vengeance, but despite a sturdy commitment to maintaining its strange tone and an atmosphere as hypnotic and mysterious as it is grimy and off-putting, the undercooked premise and uninspiring plot devoid of tension and exposition make this a Cronenbore.

  • Halloween

    Halloween

    ★½

    Rob Zombie may be a mostly competent director but proves he’s a far worse writer, with a brainless, infantile script that seems to care more about gore, sex, and violence than on the careful construction of tension that made the original so effective.

  • Everything Everywhere All at Once

    Everything Everywhere All at Once

    ★½

    The only entertaining part of this insufferably convoluted, ridiculous, corny, and self-indulgent mess besides the welcome return of 80s icon Ke Huy Quan are most of its fight scenes, particularly one very silly one that involves make-shift butt plugs—which also reminds me how far up its own ass this film is.

  • Hi, Mom!

    Hi, Mom!

    ★★★

    Structurally and narratively, it’s a bit of a mess, and the budget shows in multiple areas, but De Niro’s magnetic turn, De Palma’s avant-garde approach with the aid of Paul Hirsch’s electric editing (both clearly inspired by Jean-Luc Godard), an entertaining dialogue (largely improvised), an interesting look into New York amid the Vietnam War and racial upheaval, and a plot that ranges from chill to “what the fuck is going on” keep Hi, Mom! afloat.

  • Men

    Men

    ★★★

    Alex Garland deviates from his usual science fiction to horror this time, but Men is perhaps a bit too messy and bizarre for its own good and stumbles more in delivering an effective message than in unsettling, shocking, bewildering, and occasionally amusing.

  • X

    X

    ★★½

    The stylish direction and editing and a clear homage to 70s exploitation B-movies, pornos, and most obviously The Texas Chain Saw Massacre are not done any service by the ham-fisted and pretentious delivery of a thin but drawn out plot with dumb jump scares, irritating characters, silly death scenes, and ridiculous villains—which (spoilers-ish) consist of a sexually frustrated old hag and her rotten husband who’s afraid getting it on with her will give him a heart attack but is perfectly fine with killing innocent people.

  • Thor: Love and Thunder

    Thor: Love and Thunder

    ★★½

    Its heart is in the right place, but it seems all accountability was checked at the door when it comes to the script.

  • Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness

    Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness

    ★★★

    Sam Raimi adds a refreshing and much needed spice with his signature style and wacky humor that we all know and have come to love, and although the film can be a bit jumbled and cheesy at times, and the script obviously could have used more work, the result is still a sufficiently entertaining and heartfelt diversion from the more recently serious chapters in the MCU.