J. Lourcelles Dictionnaire du Cinéma

J. Lourcelles Dictionnaire du Cinéma

Translating (or trying my best at it) and sharing texts from the great Dictionnaire du Cinéma - Les films, by Jacques Lourcelles.

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  • Rear Window

  • The Big Trail

  • The Party

  • Paris Belongs to Us

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  • Rear Window

    Rear Window

    One of the most experimental and most perfect films of the master of suspense. Rear Window acknowledged a great success when it first came out, something that didn’t failed to repeat thirty years later, notably on its rerelease in France (during the 1983-1984 year span, it placed in the 20th position of all films distributed; exceptional result for a film that old). The basic situation where the character finds himself - immobility, voyeurism, passionate and passively waiting - and the…

  • The Big Trail

    The Big Trail

    Walsh’s fourth talking picture. The considerable production resources available allowed him to deploy the full extent of his genius. Filming took a year and was done almost only in exteriors (in Wyoming). It is Walsh’s best film of the decade and a summit of cinema. Many sequences - like that of the descent of the chariots in the canyon - are amongst the most spectaculars that we've ever seen on a movie screen. In this epic documentary, Walsh, who is…

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  • The Party

    The Party

    Blake Edwards and Peter Sellers's masterpiece.
    The most well-succeeded and funniest comedy that’s been seen in the last twenty years. Blake Edwards renews the old burlesque - art founded in silent cinema, over an uninterrupted succession of misunderstandings and catastrophes one bigger than the other - adding to it the prestige of color, luxe and a clever mise-en-scène of a fascinating and oneiric slowness. Gags, which are many and very effectible, don’t need to be original to achieve perfection. They’re…

  • The New Centurions

    The New Centurions

    Based on the novel written by Joseph Wambaugh, an old LA police sergeant, this is one of the most original policial films, and one of the most representative of 70’s American cinema. Like Don Siegel in Dirty Harry*, Fleischer doesn’t seek neither to create a new hero nor to cultivate the spectacular. Realistic, documentary, the movie tries to show by the most concrete manner possible the city life degradation and the ensuing demoralization of some police officers, as they’re unable…