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  • Bright Star

  • Inglourious Basterds

  • Mark of an Angel

  • Mammoth

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  • Bright Star

    Bright Star

    Like every other Quentin Tarantino movie to date, INGLOURIOUS BASTERDS (2009, 153 min, 35mm widescreen; Friday, December 26, 7:30pm and Tuesday, December 29, 6:30pm) was marketed as entertainment, achieved prominence through widespread debate, and then was begrudgingly accepted as an art movie--a trajectory only confirmed by this end-of-the-year return to the Film Center. While it took a few years for JACKIE BROWN and DEATH PROOF to yield insightful analysis, the accelerated pace of web discourse in 2009 allowed BASTERDS to…

  • Inglourious Basterds

    Inglourious Basterds

    Like every other Quentin Tarantino movie to date, INGLOURIOUS BASTERDS (2009, 153 min, 35mm widescreen; Friday, December 26, 7:30pm and Tuesday, December 29, 6:30pm) was marketed as entertainment, achieved prominence through widespread debate, and then was begrudgingly accepted as an art movie--a trajectory only confirmed by this end-of-the-year return to the Film Center. While it took a few years for JACKIE BROWN and DEATH PROOF to yield insightful analysis, the accelerated pace of web discourse in 2009 allowed BASTERDS to…

Popular reviews

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  • Day of the Dead

    Day of the Dead

    The 1980s were undoubtedly the worst decade for American cinema, not only because Hollywood studios resigned themselves almost exclusively to making products instead of films, but because even the best filmmakers of this time failed to acknowledge the Totalitarian implications of the Reagan era. Compared to the number of anti-war films made during the Vietnam years--or, for that matter, the eloquent anti-Thatcher films that defined contemporaneous British filmmaking (Dennis Potter's BLADE ON THE FEATHER, Stephen Frears' SAMMY AND ROSIE GET…

  • Two-Lane Blacktop

    Two-Lane Blacktop

    From Kent Jones' essay for the Criterion Collection's DVD release, a superb piece of writing that's worth quoting at length: "[The movie creates] a trancelike absorption in movement and ritual. Hellman's film, like [Jacques Rivette's] PARIS BELONGS TO US, is comprised of many of the in-between moments that most filmmakers would cut. In the process, a strange terrain of tenderness and disconnection inhabited by the four principal characters is mapped out: their shared remoteness is exactly what makes it safe…