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  • Northern Pursuit

    Northern Pursuit

    Sarris's "Far Side of Paradise" entry for Walsh in The American Cinema (1969). "Far Side of Paradise" refers to "the directors who fall short of the Pantheon either because of a fragmentation of their personal vision or because of disruptive career problems."

    If the heroes of Ford are sustained by tradition, and the heroes of Hawks by professionalism, the heroes of Walsh are sustained by nothing more than a feeling for adventure. The Fordian hero knows why he is doing…

  • Desperate Journey

    Desperate Journey

    Sarris's "Far Side of Paradise" entry for Walsh in The American Cinema (1969). "Far Side of Paradise" refers to "the directors who fall short of the Pantheon either because of a fragmentation of their personal vision or because of disruptive career problems."

    If the heroes of Ford are sustained by tradition, and the heroes of Hawks by professionalism, the heroes of Walsh are sustained by nothing more than a feeling for adventure. The Fordian hero knows why he is doing…

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  • Les Dames du Bois de Boulogne

    Les Dames du Bois de Boulogne

    Robert Bresson's Les Dames du Bois de Boulogne deserves a few explanatory notes, if only because this brilliant work has been so widely and wildly vilified by so-called realistic criticism. Realism, as Harold Rosenberg has so sagely remarked, is but one of the 57 varieties of decoration. Yet, particularly where movies are concerned, the absurdly limited realism of the script girl and the shop girl is too often invoked at the expense of the artist's meaning. Why, oh why, whines…

  • Abraham Lincoln

    Abraham Lincoln

    Andrew Sarris's "Pantheon" entry for D.W. Griffith in The American Cinema (1968)

    It is about time that D.W. Griffith was rescued from the false pedestal of an outmoded pioneer. The cinema of Griffith is no more outmoded, after all, than the drama of Aeschylus. When one observes in the bird-in-a-cage telephone-booth image in Hitchcock’s The Birds a derivation of a similarly objective viewpoint in Griffith’s Broken Blossoms, the alleged antiquity of Griffith becomes more dubious than ever. Only in film…