Stories

MUBI Talks to Oliver Sim About His Film "Hideous"

Oliver Sim is the star and co-writer of Yann Gonzalez's Hideous, now showing exclusively on MUBI in the series Brief Encounters. In this three-part queer horror movie, Sim is the main guest on a talk show that soon slides into a surreal journey of love, shame, and blood. The film also features songs from Sim’s debut album, Hideous Bastard.

The Current Debate: “Nope” and the Society of the Spectacle

Jordan Peele’s Nope is a UFO story where characters aren’t concerned with killing an alien so much as capturing it on camera. In that regard, it’s an extraterrestrial thriller that feels very much in sync with our zeitgeist, one whose chief preoccupation revolves around our struggles to process singular, horrific happenings in an age when they are so swiftly commodified into something sellable, scrollable, and endlessly watchable. 

Shot Verse Shot: "Benediction" and Poetry in Cinema

Films about art and artists face different obstacles in making the art itself cinematic. A movie about a painter, like Pollock (2000) or My Left Foot (1989), can simply observe them at work. Keiichi Hara’s animated film Miss Hokusai (2015), about the artist Hokusai and his daughter, can visually quote its subject’s ukiyo-e prints directly. On the same wavelength, Dorota Kobiela and Hugh Welchman’s Loving Vincent (2017) tells of van Gogh’s final days with animation composed of oil painting cels imitating the artist’s own style. Writing is more difficult to depict. “Writer”…

Recent reviews

Céline Sciamma flipped the male gaze on its head to present its female version: a feminist tale of lesbian desire, aching romanticism, and creative collaboration. The result is an instant classic, glistening with sumptuous images and the unforgettable duo of Adèle Haenel and Noémie Merlant.

Now showing here.

European cinema’s enfant terrible Gaspar Noé is back with a formally audacious, split-screen tour de force. With revelatory performances from French New Wave icon Françoise Lebrun and horror maestro Dario Argento, Vortex grapples at the heart-wrenching limits of love, comfort, and mortality.

Now showing here.

Tilda Swinton chills as an ice-cold avatar of maternal resentment and regret in Lynne Ramsay’s reckoning with familial dysfunction. Draped in chiaroscuro lighting, deliberately sparse domestic spaces eerily evoke the tension between nature and nurture, and the characters’ vacant emotional lives.

Now showing here.

Penélope Cruz gives what might just be her greatest performance in this seventh collaboration with Pedro Almodóvar. Marrying exquisite melodrama to a searing interrogation of Spain’s historic trauma, Parallel Mothers is a vivid tale of female companionship that stands among the maestro’s finest.

Now showing here.

Rohmer’s last comedy of manners in his “Tales of Four Seasons” cycle was a big commercial success and won the Best Screenplay award in Venice. In the bucolic vineyards of Southern France, the search for love of Magali, played by Marie Rivière, gives way to a multitude of romantic entanglements.

Now showing here.

An act of communal restoration lies at the heart of this tragicomic epic from Zhang Yimou, a film which shares a spiritual kinship with the nostalgic classic Cinema Paradiso. A visually ravishing tale of triumph over adversity, One Second is a bittersweet ode to the magic of the silver screen.

Now showing here.

Presenting the final masterwork by Jean-Luc Godard, the French New Wave titan whose inventive brilliance will be impossible to replace. Winner of the first-ever Special Palme d’Or at Cannes, The Image Book is a riotous whirlwind of images and sounds from the father of modern cinema. Forever JLG.

Now showing here.

One of the most beloved films in modern international cinema, Giuseppe Tornatore’s nostalgic ode to moviegoing and childhood is suffused with an unwavering romanticism. Winner of the Oscar© for Best Foreign Language Feature, Cinema Paradiso is a heartfelt love letter to cinephiles everywhere.

Now showing here.