Simon

I’m fascinated by puppy love. Specifically, the romantic yearning one experiences during the prepubescent years...

The first woman I fell in love with was Madeline Kahn. I can tell you the moment it happened. I was a young boy watching Sesame Street. Grover and Ms. Khan were singing their famous duet, Sing After Me, and I found the performance titillating. Ms. Khan held Grover snuggly in her lap, and I found myself wishing I could somehow switch places with the muppet...

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Not long after that, I began developing feelings for Judy Graubart on the Electric Company. Specifically when she was playing her Jennifer of the Jungle character...

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I used to have a recurring dream where I was Paul the Gorilla. I’d throw Jennifer over my shoulder and take her to live with me in a treehouse.

So, full disclosure, my main reason for seeking out Simon was to satisfy the urge of experiencing something with both of these women. And I’m happy to report that it did not disappoint. They’re both here and they’re both wonderful.

However, with that said, this is much more than a gallery of childhood crushes. This is a great movie. Flawed, but brilliant. Like most interesting stuff. 

I’ve always had my suspicions about Marshall Brickman, but now I’m sure he belongs in the same conversation as Vonnegut, Chayefsky and Roth. That upper echelon of satirical dexterity. 

Perhaps like me, you’d wondered how substantial Mr. Brickman’s contributions to the films he wrote with Woody Allen (Manhattan, Annie Hall, Sleeper) were. Simon, in a sense, almost works like a paternity test with those pictures. Give it a watch and I’m sure you’ll be re-evaluating their authorship.