• Night Raiders

    Night Raiders

    A dystopian future tale rooted in Canada’s colonial and genocidal past. Danis Goulet uses genre to frame and explore the history of both residential schools and Indigenous resistance. 

    Elle-Maija Tailfeathers is always so watchable. Newcomer Brooklyn Latexier-Hart holds her own. Violet Nelson is a delight and has all the best lines - also loved that Goulet highlighted a very different style of leadership through her character. And cool to see a Maori character - Goulet’s homage to global Indigenous solidarity and support networks. 

    Plus, I cheered to see a cameo from Danis’ dad & first ever Indigenous SK cabinet minister, Keith Goulet!

  • Zo Reken

    Zo Reken

    How lucky are we to get this fly on the wall view of Haiti, a country many of us only know from disaster reporting on the news? Was not expecting this back seat view to be so beautifully shot either.

  • Time

    Time

    Charmed my genre film-loving pants off. Patrick Tse and Petrina Fung shine bright. I knew I was going to love it from the opening credit sequence. Campy, great fight scenes, but ultimately quite sweet.

  • All My Puny Sorrows

    All My Puny Sorrows

    Alison Pill and Sarah Gadon are amazing. Truly. And Mare Winningham is the most underrated and criminally underused actress of the Brat Pack generation.

  • Birds of Paradise

    Birds of Paradise

    Can never pass up a ballet movie. Lots of melodrama but the dance sequences are lacklustre - they default to camera tricks because the dancing isn’t that impressive on its own. Diana Silvers is really compelling.

  • The Green Knight

    The Green Knight

    Lowry really knows how to shoot a gorgeous picture. Stunning atmospheric folk horror / quest movie. Dev Patel is perfection - he hits just the right notes to make Gawain both honourable and cowardly, romantic hero and drunken loser, ambitious and stuck. And nobody steals a scene or flips the switch between silly and menacing better than Barry Keoghan.

  • He's All That

    He's All That

    Is this the script the 10,000 monkeys with typewriters came up with? What a stinker. Horrifically bad writing, horrifically bad acting. The only good and decent thing about it: the ever brilliant Matthew Lillard.

  • She's All That

    She's All That

    This movie’s not great. But oh, 1999 fashion. Also a reminder that it must be my glasses that are impeding my love life. Sigh.

  • Blue Crush

    Blue Crush

    Sometimes you just want to watch a ridiculous sports movie. I am envious of Kate here, mostly because I have never had a triangle bikini top stay on that well. No nip slips in 20 foot waves is a way bigger accomplishment than riding that pipe!

  • Pig

    Pig

    I’m not sure why everyone goes looking for the punchline in a Nic Cage movie but there isn’t one here. Just a very damaged grieving man in search of his stolen truffle pig who manages to help a young man with his own grief and a big mess of daddy issues. Maybe this would have seemed a bit more absurd if the performances had felt campy, but Cage, Wolff and Arkin are pretty great together.

  • Ema

    Ema

    This review may contain spoilers. I can handle the truth.

    A complicated character study. At the beginning of the film, I sympathized with Ema. She seemed to be grieving, lamenting the decision to give back the orphan she and her husband had adopted. But as the film progressed, the more convinced I became that she was a sociopath. Her thrill is in manipulating people. She takes and takes and takes from people. Even when she “gives back” with her intense gaze and sex, she’s really just taking from them again.…

  • Summer of Soul (...or, When the Revolution Could Not Be Televised)

    Summer of Soul (...or, When the Revolution Could Not Be Televised)

    Brilliant. It’s not just the music (which is killer), it’s the way Questlove contextualizes the event - the politics of it all. And how applicable and relevant those politics and ideas are today. The reactions to the moon landing feel like a simultaneous reference to Gil Scott Heron’s Whitey on the Moon and a response to the current billionaires’ fave pastime. The editing work here is just absolutely brilliant - there is so much spliced together to give us the…