The Green Ray

The Green Ray

Comedies & Proverbs #5
'Oh! May the time come when hearts fall in love'

Towering.
Rivière spends much of the film explaining herself, verbalising and justifying decisions and events which she feels truly passionate about - her character is, in some ways, sure of herself, but at the very same time achingly unsure of her place within the society which surrounds her. She is lonely, and she doesn't want to be, yet she can't let herself connect to the light-weight, surface-level conversations which seem to define what 'meeting new people' is. She spends much of her time on vacation alone because she feels at home with nature, but in these quiet moments of silence and isolation, the overwhelming pain of an existential uncertainty all of a sudden seems too much to bear.
Rohmer's cinema is built upon these complexities, and through his unassuming, subtle evocations of everything human, we get a small glimpse of something truly universal (I see so much of myself and others in Delphine that it feels disingenuous to label her as a 'character'). One of the great performances, some of Rohmer's most subtly refined direction and an ending which is about as close as cinema can get to being transcendent. There's so much I want to say about this, but I don't think I'll ever find the right words for something so beautiful. A perfect film.

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