Favorite films

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  • Drag Me to Hell

    ★★★★½

  • Under the Silver Lake

    ★★★★

  • Candyman

    ★★★★½

  • Pig

    ★★★★

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  • Drag Me to Hell

    Drag Me to Hell

    ★★★★½

    This film opens with a child being violently dragged to hell, and that's probably the least ridiculous supernatural thing this film has to offer, and honestly, it's just amazing. The way this film analyzes the concept of choice under late capitalism (as something to be judged by forces beyond humanity) approaches profundity, which feels weird to say about a movie in which a lifeless corpse essentially vomits embalming fluid(s) on the main character's face.

    And that bloody nose scene is just *chef's kiss*.

  • Under the Silver Lake

    Under the Silver Lake

    ★★★★

    Under The Silver Lake comes closer to Thomas Pynchon than any other film I've ever seen (and that includes the sole Pynchon adaptation, Inherent Vice, by PTA). It's ultimately about a paranoia induced search for meaning in a world in which 'meaning' has been commodified, perverted, and reserved for the elite. There is a scene in which a lady tells Sam (played wonderfully by Andrew Garfield): "don't waste your energy on pointless things", as she blows up a little balloon…

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  • Malcolm & Marie

    Malcolm & Marie

    Malcolm & Marie is one of the most insultingly vapid, and reprehensible films I've seen in years. Within six minutes of sitting down and watching it (I went in expecting to at least like it) I was physically repulsed: audibly groaning, and shifting in my seat after each line of infantile and moronic dialogue spilled from the mouths of the incredibly unlikable characters on screen. The script is rotten to its core; written with the emotional immaturity of an early twenties…

  • Pig

    Pig

    ★★★★

    Deconstruction: Making the familiar feel...foreign.

    The concept of revenge is cooked into the DNA of modern movies, such that when there is a blatant wrong done to a (main/important) character in a film, audiences expect a vengeful cathartic resolution to said wrongdoing; even so-called deconstructionist films in this "genre" directly engage revenge by involving it in the story: Pig avoids that pitfall entirely. Revenge isn't even on the periphery of this film, in fact, every single bit of (possible) conflict…