Matthew LeCHARLTON

Matthew LeCHARLTON

"All the world will be your enemy, Prince with a Thousand Enemies"

Favorite films

  • Ran
  • Jean de Florette
  • The Shining
  • The Devils

Recent activity

All
  • The Princess Bride

    ★★★★½

  • Flowers of Shanghai

    ★★★★

  • The Killer

    ★★★½

  • Weekend

    ★★

Recent reviews

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  • The Princess Bride

    The Princess Bride

    ★★★★½

    A straightforward fairytale plot that in entering parody restraints itself from the cynicism of Mel Brooks and the absurdity of Monty Python. In its self awareness rather than mock the genre it enhances it to a level both child and adult can appreciate, something Disney would use as a repeat formula from the 90's onward.

  • Flowers of Shanghai

    Flowers of Shanghai

    ★★★★

    Slow moving period drama about the relationships of a group of late 19th century high end prostitutes and their suitors.

    The films is casually and elegantly shot with slow pans across the warmly lit chambers of each girl as they pursue emancipation from their house through love or freedom.

    It demands patience and concentration. It is without action and is a film that attempts to say more through the silent reflection of its characters than in dialogue.

    For me the film succeeds aesthetically and emotionally in capturing the ennui of the inhabitants of its luxurious brothels but doesn't elevate to more than a pretty mood piece.

Popular reviews

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  • The Banshees of Inisherin

    The Banshees of Inisherin

    ★★★★½

    A dark tale of friendships end

    As Irish brothers fight an Irish War Of Independence with one another so too does Colm Doherty an aspiring musician. He no longer wants to be the friend of Padraic (I won't spell his surname) a simple and kind man who lives on the island with his sister and loves all of gods creations.

    The film is dark and serious, its frequently blackly comic and its intentions are intentionally ambiguous. Fans of the Coen's…

  • Chinatown

    Chinatown

    ★★★★★

    An Evil Basking In Sun-baked Noir

    Few films perfectly capture an era and style so authentically replicated that a first time viewer would be forgiven for thinking it was made in 1937. Chinatown’s infamous script, posing as fiction but sourced from fact, is a complex but watertight tale of LA Corruption that requires approximately 3 viewings to feel concise. Accompanying its superb mis-en-scene & script is Polanski’s classical style of direction that can only count Coppola’s Godfather as those worthy to…