kong ayanami

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  • Ned Rifle

    ★★★★★

  • Sergei Parajanov. A Visit

    ★★★★

  • The Wishing Ring: An Idyll of Old England

    ★★½

  • The Scary of Sixty-First

    ★★★★★

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  • Synecdoche, New York

    Synecdoche, New York

    ★★★★★

    There are countless moments that mean the world to me in Syncedoche, New York, to the point that I could probably literally write a book on this film. It has helped shape me as a person and a cinephile. I am a total Charlie Kaufman simp and can never overstate how much his vision has influenced my own as an aspiring filmmaker. Every time I see Synecdoche, I notice new things and feel the weight of different moments. This time,…

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  • Ned Rifle

    Ned Rifle

    ★★★★★

    The three films comprising Hal Hartley’s Henry Fool trilogy are wildly different in style and tone, yet together they form a monumental epic of sin, forgiveness and the ties that bind. This conclusion — Hartley’s most recent film to date — is melancholy, witty and disturbing in equal measure. The religious element adds another layer of depth that I found immensely rewarding and meaningful. Hartley is one of the greats, even if he flies unjustly under the radar of the mainstream.

  • The Scary of Sixty-First

    The Scary of Sixty-First

    ★★★★★

    Polanski’s Repulsion but it’s a shitpost. Betsey Brown is epically unhinged. Vinegar Syndrome’s Blu-Ray is stunning. Happy birthday to the brilliant and button-pushing Dasha Nekrasova. In an alternate world that’s actually fun and cool, this was hailed as an instant arthouse classic.

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  • The Story of Menstruation

    The Story of Menstruation

    ★★★½

    put this on Disney Plus you cowards

  • Je, Tu, Il, Elle

    Je, Tu, Il, Elle

    ★★★★★

    The reason I have fallen so madly in love with Chantal Akerman's work is the unparalleled understanding and empathy with which she handles mental illness, loneliness and malaise. There is no greater auteur of sorrow and isolation. When we meet Julie, her character in Je, tu, il, elle, she is quietly experiencing a psychotic break alone in her apartment after a breakup. She paints her walls, rewrites the same letter repeatedly, and reduces herself to eating powdered sugar for sustenance.…