Jordan has written 16 reviews for films rated ★★★★★ .

  • The Wizard of Oz

    The Wizard of Oz

    ★★★★★

    Got this on Blu-ray for my bday and I must say it POPS

  • Edward Scissorhands

    Edward Scissorhands

    ★★★★★

    The very best F- you to suburbia ever crafted

  • Z

    Z

    ★★★★★

    One of the most influential political thrillers post-WWII. I didn't really know anything about this film before watching it. I had seen Missing (1982), directed by Costa-Gavras, for a political film course, but it wasn't the best I'd seen. After seeing this film and its impact on international political discourse, I understand more of why he had to make Missing weaker than it could have been. While Z is a very Greek film that only recently had seen such corruption…

  • The Elephant Man

    The Elephant Man

    ★★★★★

    Coming off of his cult-classic debut Eraserhead (1977), David Lynch received critical acclaim for his portrait of human decency and social exploitation in The Elephant Man. Based on the real-life case of John Merrick who was born with severe deformities and paraded as a "freak" by a late 1800s English ringmaster, The Elephant Man is a critique of how we as humans treat differences and abnormalities that make us uncomfortable. 

    As with Eraserhead, sound is an important part in creating an uncomfortable…

  • It's a Wonderful Life

    It's a Wonderful Life

    ★★★★★

    This movie amazes me every time I see it. It's not without its flaws, but it has just about everything I want in a rewatchable, touching, well-made film. It just makes me feel warm inside whenever I watch it.

    Instead of finding something new to say about it, here's the essay I wrote on it for an internship prompt a few years ago(it was for the WA State legislature internship so it's a little focused towards that):

    As I look…

  • The Passion of Joan of Arc

    The Passion of Joan of Arc

    ★★★★★

    Such a hauntingly beautiful film. From the score to the lightning to the closeups of a teary-eyed Falconetti, the sense of dread, solitude, and martyrdom is not lost in the direction of Dreyer.

    It may sound oxymoronic to call an 82 minute film slow, but with the tight, claustrophobic shots that generally convey progression through facial expressions and sporadic text with never-ending questions, accusations, and quick defense, it feels that the story isn’t progressing. I take the slow progression to…

  • Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban

    Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban

    ★★★★★

    Yes I've watched this twice this month

  • The Grand Budapest Hotel

    The Grand Budapest Hotel

    ★★★★★

    I watched this snowed into my house with cozy lights and a fireplace on... aside from seeing it in a theater I think this is the most ideal way for it to be watched.

  • Dog Day Afternoon

    Dog Day Afternoon

    ★★★★★

    I knew this was an effective anti-authority, anti-establishment, counterculture film when the head counter woman is outside with Sonny and the cop tries to be the hero and keep her outside and she simply says “Those are my girls, I’m going back in there,” to the sound of applause from the crowd. 

    The protesting of the Vietnam War, peace protests, and progressive movements were generally headed by students and young, inexperienced minds. This movie begins with an amateur bank robbery…

  • Paths of Glory

    Paths of Glory

    ★★★★★

    A perfect formula for a short and effective war film. Kubrick comments on the loss of humanity and empathy one must have to become a model soldier. When the general perceives a soldier coming to terms with his mortality and fear of death in the war, he is cut loose for fear of “spreading it”- as if humanity and introspection is a disease for a barricade. One officer even refers to men who herd at times of peril as having…

  • Knives Out

    Knives Out

    ★★★★★

    If there’s one thing Chris Evans is gonna do, he’s gonna wear the hell out of that white sweater

  • M

    M

    ★★★★★

    The past 80 years of genius filmmaking in the thriller genre can be traced back to the monumental German film M. The film ultimately explores how we as a society deal with murder, murderers, fear of others, and our ability to cast moral judgment. 

    A large portion of this film addresses our uncomfortableness with strangers around us and our perceived lack of safety. Petty criminals fear their safety from the police because of increased presence, parents fear for their children’s…