• Judas and the Black Messiah

    Judas and the Black Messiah

    ★★★★½

    The most important movie to come out in the past year (including 2020). It’s insane that I would have never learned about Fred Hampton or the community-driven efforts of the Black Panther Party had I not elected to take an African American Studies class my freshman year of college. Even then, we only had time to spend a few days on the Black Panthers on a very surface level, so I had to dig deeper on my own with books…

  • Revolutionary Road

    Revolutionary Road

    ★★★★

    I wish Leo and Kate had become the next William Powell and Myrna Loy where they play the main couple in tons of movies with different plots. They have such an intense chemistry that is translated in different situations and types of relationships. In Titanic we see their chemistry in full blast where you don’t think they could possibly be with anyone else, whereas in Revolutionary Road they play a couple who doesn’t belong together, but you understand the chemistry that brought them together. Seeing them in a film together again is really just a joy that I could have used more of in their careers.

  • Cats

    Cats

    I watched this and A Nightmare on Elm Street today... which one do you think scared me more

  • A Nightmare on Elm Street

    A Nightmare on Elm Street

    ★★★★½

    A classic 80s slasher film that hits all of the tropes and introduces an incredibly fear-inducing premise. Even though I’ve known about this film since I was a child through kids singing the “Freddy’s Coming For You” song and general Krueger imagery around Halloween, this is the first time I’ve actually sat down and watched it through. 

    This film truly cemented Wes Craven as the master of horror. He can hit all the beats, write a story that’s absurd yet realistically…

  • Beautiful Girls

    Beautiful Girls

    ★★★

    Uma Thurman and Natalie Portman as the ultimate cool girl: a mood

  • Dog Day Afternoon

    Dog Day Afternoon

    ★★★★★

    I knew this was an effective anti-authority, anti-establishment, counterculture film when the head counter woman is outside with Sonny and the cop tries to be the hero and keep her outside and she simply says “Those are my girls, I’m going back in there,” to the sound of applause from the crowd. 

    The protesting of the Vietnam War, peace protests, and progressive movements were generally headed by students and young, inexperienced minds. This movie begins with an amateur bank robbery…

  • Harold and Maude

    Harold and Maude

    ★★★★½

    Harold and Maude is a definitive example of the New Hollywood era of the 60s and 70s. The film is a charming dramedy following the friendship of an eccentric 20 year old boy and a 79 year old woman who share a hobby of attending strangers’ funerals. 

    This film really reminded me of The Graduate in its existential crises, finding who you are, and dealing with the uncertainty and denial of the expectations of one’s future. Also similar to The Graduate is the…

  • Little Women

    Little Women

    ★★½

    This script and casting actually made me hate the characters, which I never thought would be possible. The casting of Jo is pretty terrible. Winona Ryder is the perfect emulation of Jo while this casting of her is definitely the worst out of all adaptations. With Janet Leigh and Elizabeth Taylor in two of the other starring roles, this should have been great. But, with Elizabeth Taylor older than Margaret O’Brien (very obviously older, I might add), the interactions seem…

  • Great Expectations

    Great Expectations

    ★★★½

    Upsetting that young Obi-Wan looks nothing like Ewan McGregor

  • A Star Is Born

    A Star Is Born

    ★★★

    A Star is Born (2018) definitely improved nearly all aspects of this installment. This movie mostly felt like a 2 hour long Streisand and Kristofferson concert with some whiny dialogue here and there. I still enjoy the two together so I liked the film, but it has none of the nuance and depth in characters of the 1954 and 2018 versions. Bradley Cooper gave so much more range to the male counterpart than just the bland, alcoholic, jealous rockstar Kristofferson…

  • Ford v Ferrari

    Ford v Ferrari

    ★★★★

    Christian Bale as a cheerful, stubbornly charming Brit isn’t one I’ve seen before, but a role I really enjoyed seeing him in. Matt Damon was still pretty good, but I felt like I wasn’t completely invested when Christian Bale is offscreen- his character and charisma really carried the story. 

    I’ll put it out there that this movie is not made for me. I’m not a 50 year old dad, I don’t like NASCAR, and the closest to race car films…

  • Malcolm & Marie

    Malcolm & Marie

    ★★★

    A star for Zendaya, a star for John David Washington, and a star for the cinematography. The performances and camerawork are incredible, but the script is uneven and generally too pretentious to be groundbreaking or rewarded. The final Marie monologue about wanting him to appreciate her and say “thank you” feels like it belongs in a different film. Don’t get me wrong, Zendaya acts her heart out in that scene and gives a moving performance, but it seemed out of…