JakubM

JakubM

Favorite films

  • Fantasia
  • Return to Seoul
  • Starship Troopers
  • We're All Going to the World's Fair

Recent activity

All
  • May December

    ★★★★★

  • You Hurt My Feelings

    ★★★½

  • Zombieland

    ★★½

  • Cameraperson

    ★★★★★

Recent reviews

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  • May December

    May December

    ★★★★★

    In which Todd Haynes continues his fascinating rehabilitation of the melodrama, a genre recognized for its capacity to identify oppression in normalcy and liberation in noncomformity. May December flips the Sirkian script, stacking taboo over convention over taboo until it's hard to see where one ends and the other begins. We're initially on Elizabeth's side, asking the exact same set of questions: how did Gracie, a 36-year-old woman, abandon her family to carry on an affair with a seventh grader,…

  • You Hurt My Feelings

    You Hurt My Feelings

    ★★★½

    Nicole Holofcener makes it look easy. You Hurt My Feelings is yet another funny, understated, and observant little film about the vicissitudes of the urban middle class. In this case, Beth, an author of a well-received memoir now working on her first novel, is married to Don, a psychologist whose enthusiasm for work, if not life in general, is waning. One day Beth overhears Don criticizing the book. Naturally, her feelings are hurt. The stage is set. Most immediately, the…

Popular reviews

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  • Earwig

    Earwig

    ★★★★½

    Once again, Lucile Hadžihalilović hits the ground dreaming with ambivalent caretakers and an almost overwhelming number of signifiers. Earwig is, for all its stillness, always in flux, caught between a fairy tale and a horror film, and routinely soaked in otherworldly postwar malaise. Every frame is a stunning collage of greens, ambers, and reds—and don't even get me started on the exterior shots, which make incredible use of texture and pattern. You can almost smell the rain, run your fingers…

  • R.M.N.

    R.M.N.

    ★★★★½

    While an actual MRI figures in the narrative for just a brief period (R.M.N. is the Romanian acronym), it encapsulates what Cristian Mungiu is doing here: scanning the collective consciousness of a small Transylvanian community for the root causes of rising enthnonationalism, xenophobia, economic stagnation, and a general sense of social malaise. It layers an almost maddeningly complex (and necessarily interconnected) array of dynamics to tease out these issues. This is a rapidly transforming world, with preexisting relationships between Romanian and…