• Signs

    Signs

    ★★★★½

    I want to write more about this, but that dinner scene… yeah that broke me. If you’re going to homage another movie so much, JAWS is not a bad pick.

  • The Lost City

    The Lost City

    ★★

    They could’ve added a dial tone into the score with how phoned in this movie was

  • The Black Phone

    The Black Phone

    ★★★½

    Anyone else find it a little funny that Scott Derickson left a film about dreams to direct a film… about dreams?

  • The Man From Toronto

    The Man From Toronto

    What a lifeless dump of a film

  • The Lobster

    The Lobster

    ★★★★½

    “If you encounter any problems you cannot resolve yourselves, you will be assigned children, that usually helps”

  • Elvis

    Elvis

    Look, I am not a Baz Luhrman fan in the slightest, but WOW. Whereas most of his film feel like a hollow chocolate Easter bunny (a treat on the outside with nothing on the inside), this is a chocolate Easter bunny filled with vomit and poison. Genuinely trying to rack my brain to remember the last big budget film whose racial politics felt this dated. Austin Butler’s stellar performance and the intricate sound design are the only saving graces here.

  • Chan Is Missing

    Chan Is Missing

    ★★★★½

    A supremely underseen gem from the 1980’s that captures the immigrant experience in an extremely honest fashion. Definitely one of my favorite “the city is a character” type of films. A movie where every single detail of the surrounding world is tactile in a story about feeling inherently removed from the world around you,

  • Lightyear

    Lightyear

    ★★

    For a movie whose marketing is hellbent on letting the audience know that this would’ve been released in 1995, Lightyear’s complete lack of style or creative storytelling, humorless “banter” dialogue, and persistent need to cater to the audience feels very 2022

  • Father Stu

    Father Stu

    I really wish Letterboxd would let you log trailers, because if you’ve seen the trailer for Father Stu, you’ve seen Father Stu

  • Good Luck to You, Leo Grande

    Good Luck to You, Leo Grande

    ★★★½

    Surprisingly tender, if a little on the nose (though justifiably so). Thompson is a marvel here, as is McCormack, and their chemistry is undeniable. The play-like structure is clever but really limits the filmmaking at play. Would’ve loved to see a little more imagination regarding how this story is told, as the story deserves something a little more than this.

  • Father of the Bride

    Father of the Bride

    ★½

    There’s a fundamental flaw with this modern reimagining of Father of the Bride that I’ve noticed in many modern films, and it’s one that irritates me to no end. The film sets up a battle of wits, a clash between tradition and the “new age”, one where many films have ended with compromise between the two sides, much like this film attempts to do. The problem is that the film has taken Andy Garcia’s side for the entire runtime before the…

  • Cha Cha Real Smooth

    Cha Cha Real Smooth

    ★★★★★

    On my third watch of this, I realize that this film is, in essence, very similar to Jerry Maguire. It’s disguised as a rom-com, but it’s really the story of one man who cannot stand to be alone learning To enjoy the company of an empty room. I even found myself thinking about the memo that Jerry gives out in the latter film, as Raiff’s script here is made up of “the things we feel but do not say”. For…