• Faya Dayi

    Faya Dayi

    In her hypnotic documentary feature, Ethiopian-Mexican filmmaker Jessica Beshir explores the coexistence of everyday life and its mythical undercurrents. Though a deeply personal project—Beshir was forced to leave her hometown of Harar with her family as a teenager due to growing political strife—the film she returned to make about the city, its rural Oromo community of farmers, and the harvesting of the country’s most sought-after export (the euphoria-inducing khat plant) is neither a straightforward work of nostalgia nor an issue-oriented…

  • Isabella

    Isabella

    Argentine filmmaker Matías Piñeiro continues to explore the porous line between performance and daily ritual in his most visually striking film yet. As in such subtly magical dramas of the everyday as The Princess of France (NYFF52) and Hermia & Helena (NYFF54), Piñeiro uses a Shakespeare text to anchor a loose yet intellectually rigorous examination of life’s loves, labors, and futile pursuits, all played out with the minutest of gestures. Isabella uses Measure for Measure as inspiration, with regular Piñeiro players…

  • Passenger

    Passenger

    Incomplete at the time of Munk’s death in 1961, Passenger takes as its focus the harrowing relationship between two women in a German concentration camp, as recalled by a former guard after she encounters, years later aboard a luxury cruise ship, one of her Polish ex-prisoners. Working from footage shot just before his fatal accident, Munk’s collaborators (notably director Witold Lesiewicz and writer Wiktor Woroszylski) constructed a speculative version of the film, partially made up of still shots. The film…

  • Days

    Days

    The great Taiwanese filmmaker Tsai Ming-liang has been directing exquisite examinations of alienation, isolation, and the fleeting beauty of human connection featuring his muse Lee Kang-sheng for decades. His latest film, Days—his first feature-length fiction since 2013’s magnificent Stray Dogs (NYFF51)—will undoubtedly stand as one of his best, sparest, and most intimate works. Lee once again stars as a variation on himself, wandering through a lonely urban landscape and seeking treatment in Hong Kong for a chronic illness; at the…

  • Annette

    Annette

    Leos Carax’s much-anticipated follow-up to 2012’s brilliantly uncategorizable Holy Motors is another staggeringly ambitious, unpredictable cinematic experience from the visionary director. A years-spanning musical melodrama drenched in greens and yellows, scored by oddball art-pop duo Sparks and based on their original story, Annette marks the French director’s first English-language film, which revolves around a celebrity couple in present-day Los Angeles. Henry (Adam Driver), a towering stand-up comedian, and Ann (Marion Cotillard), a world-famous singer, are living life happily in the spotlight until their world…

  • Ailey

    Ailey

    Jamila Wignot’s affectionate portrait of Alvin Ailey moves with the same spirited intensity embodied by the visionary founder of the world-renowned Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater. Ailey poetically examines how its subject’s fascinating life inspired his passion for dance, suffusing rare archival footage with Ailey’s own words, in addition to interviews with celebrated company dancers and choreographers. Beginning with Ailey’s early experiences in the rural South, which would eventually inspire some of his most memorable works, and culminating in the…

  • The Works and Days (of Tayoko Shiojiri in the Shiotani Basin)

    The Works and Days (of Tayoko Shiojiri in the Shiotani Basin)

    Five seasons, four parts, eight hours: the dimensions of C.W. Winter and Anders Edström’s film are as incommensurable as its central figure. Tayoko Shiojiri, a vegetable farmer who works and cares for her ailing husband in a small village north of Kyoto, Japan (and who is also Edström’s mother-in-law), is the nominal core of this monumental work, a matriarch whose labor the film observes through precise tableaux, dense sonic collage, and sequences that bend all conventional distinctions between fiction and…

  • Crimson Gold

    Crimson Gold

    A searing critique of class conflict unfurls with compressed intensity in this newly remastered 2003 film by Jafar Panahi, from an original script by Abbas Kiarostami (reuniting the pair after their 1995 collaboration, The White Balloon). Crimson Gold focuses on Hussein (Hossain Emadeddin), a wounded veteran of the Iran-Iraq War lately relegated to delivering pizzas around Tehran’s wealthy districts. Despite his sedate disposition, Hussein succumbs to desperation after economic pressures gradually ensnare his life. Panahi’s concern isn’t so much with…

  • The Power of Kangwon Province

    The Power of Kangwon Province

    Hong Sangsoo followed his acclaimed 1996 debut, The Day a Pig Fell into the Well, with this understated diptych concerning a popular retreat in Kangwon, a mountainous region near Seoul. At first, the film centers on the recently single Jisook, who joins two friends on vacation and falls into a romantic entanglement with a local policeman. Then, the focus shifts to a listless professor, Sangkwon, visiting Kangwon at the same time as Jisook. Already in his sophomore feature, Hong’s soon-to-be…

  • Gull

    Gull

    O-bok, a woman in her early 60s, spends her days working at an outdoor fish market in Seoul and preparing for her daughter’s wedding. One night, her life is upended when she becomes the victim of a sexual assault by a coworker. As she comes to terms with what happened, she discovers that other colleagues have been all too eager to cover up the event, and that her family is incapable of handling her trauma. Kim Mi-jo’s searing drama—anchored by…

  • Faya Dayi

    Faya Dayi

    In her hypnotic documentary feature, Ethiopian-Mexican filmmaker Jessica Beshir explores the coexistence of everyday life and its mythical undercurrents. Though a deeply personal project—Beshir was forced to leave her hometown of Harar with her family as a teenager due to growing political strife—the film she returned to make about the city, its rural Oromo community of farmers, and the harvesting of the country’s most sought-after export (the euphoria-inducing khat plant) is neither a straightforward work of nostalgia nor an issue-oriented…

  • Eyimofe (This Is My Desire)

    Eyimofe (This Is My Desire)

    With fluid storytelling and precise, detailed attention to quotidian life, Nigerian filmmaking duo Arie Esiri and Chuko Esiri have created a tale consisting of two parallel narratives, following a pair of characters trying to transcend their daily struggles in teeming Lagos. In the first, engineer Mofe (Jude Akuwudike) wades through the paperwork necessary for him to emigrate to Spain, but sees his plans potentially thwarted when tragedy befalls his family; in the second, young hairdresser Rosa (Temi Ami-Williams) pursues various…