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For over 50 years, Film at Lincoln Center has been dedicated to supporting the art and elevating the craft of cinema and enriching film culture. The New York…

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Israeli filmmaker Nadav Lapid shows no signs of slowing down in this shattering follow-up to his bat-out-of-hell Synonyms (NYFF57). A film of radical style and splenetic anger, Ahed’s Knee accompanies a celebrated but increasingly dissociated director (Avshalom Pollak) to a small town in the desert region of Arava for a screening of his latest film. Already anguished by the news of his mother’s fatal illness (Lapid’s film was made soon after the death of his own mother, who had worked…

Collective and personal ghosts hover over every frame of Memoria, somehow the grandest yet most becalmed of Apichatpong Weerasethakul’s works. Inspired by the Thai director’s own memories and those of people he encountered while traveling across Colombia, the film follows Jessica (a wholly immersed Tilda Swinton), an expat botanist visiting her hospitalized sister in Bogotá; while there, she becomes ever more disturbed by an abyssal sound that haunts her sleepless nights and bleary-eyed days, compelling her to seek help in…

Denzel Washington stars opposite Sarita Choudhury in Mira Nair’s second fiction feature, which endures as a seminal screen romance of the 1990s. Choudhury is Mina, a Ugandan Indian from Kampala whose family leaves Uganda after the implementation of Idi Amin’s policy of forcefully expelling all Asians from the country. They wind up in Greenwood, Mississippi, living with relatives and trying to reconcile the trauma of their involuntary exile with assimilating to American culture. Some 17 years pass before Mina falls…

Among the many ways that racism is deeply entrenched in our film culture is a technical one: the lighting for movie cameras has always been calibrated for white skin, with other production tools reflecting the same bias throughout cinema history. Three filmmakers collectively explore the literal, theoretical, and philosophical dimensions of that reality in this discursive, playful, and profound work of nonfiction. In a series of thematically linked, provocative discussions and interrogations, Eléonore Yameogo from Burkina Faso, Belgian An van.…

Liked reviews

This whole NYFF 60 challenge has really been great for me! Allows me to be more thoughtful in my choices, while also allowing me to A) revisit films either I love or would like to reevaluate, B) allows me to catch up on films that I’ve been meaning to see for years, like Blue or This is Not a Film, and C) seek out obscure oddities that I would never have found out without such an impressively long list. Sugarbaby falls…

Cabaret

Cabaret

★★★★½

this valentine’s day I took the love of my life (me) to the most romantic place I could think of (the walter reade theater)

This review may contain spoilers. I can handle the truth.

***this is a review of the DIRECTOR'S CUT of Midsommar, and a detailed breakdown of the new footage after the jump***

On July 3, Ari Aster’s “Midsommar” was released on 2,700 screens across the United States. The twisted modern fairy tale —an epic fable that starts with a bleak murder-suicide, and ends with a somewhat brighter one almost 147 minutes later — was an extraordinary ask for a multiplex audience, and Aster knew full well how fortunate he was that…

Zama

Zama

★★★★½

Colonialism Roleplay ASMR - Must Watch Till End!

the first word we hear in ZAMA is "voyeur," an accusation laid against the title character by a group of women he watches bathe on the beach. zama flees as a woman pursues him, only to turn around and strike her down. it is this inciting incident that frames the rest of the film and its perspective on colonialism: not as violence against women persay, but as voyeurism. the indigenous population and…