FFFEST

A screening and talk series celebrating the achievements of women in cinema.

Favorite films

  • Asparagus
  • Variety
  • The Act of Killing
  • I Am Not a Witch

Recent activity

All
  • The Green Ray

    ★★★★

  • Caché

    ★★★★

  • Leviathan

    ★★★★

  • Entre Nous

    ★★★★

Recent reviews

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  • The Green Ray

    The Green Ray

    As we enter summer, with increasing ambiguity, I can't help but think of Eric Rohmer's Le Rayon Vert and the existential dread that's beautifully portrayed by Sophie Maintigneux's 16mm cinematography. The film follows a Parisian secretary who finds herself lost and drifting between summer plans she banefully can't commit to, searching for purpose and escape from her self-imposed solitude which isolates and defines her. The last scene where we witness the optical phenomena that happen around the moment of sunset or sunrise, "the green ray" is probably one of my favorite scenes in cinema, one that haunts and calms at the same time.

  • Caché

    Caché

    When it comes to Haneke, what seems to remain with me over the years are the moments that drag on beyond comfort, or the blunt cuts or harsh sounds that play off-screen. I was pleased to find out that Nadine Muse was partially responsible for this. Winner of multiple Césars for sound editing as well as the European Film Award for best editor, Nadine has had a prolific career bringing auteur vision to life. A recurrent collaborator of Haneke’s, Nadine…

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  • Entre Nous

    Entre Nous

    ★★★★

    I know this is an intense adjective to put to a film and should be used sparingly - but this film is a masterpiece. Every shot is so thoughtfully framed and perfectly captures the mood of the arc as the story and relationships progress. The acting is also perfect and it’s so fun watching a young Huppert.

  • Leviathan

    Leviathan

    ★★★★

    Nor the stills or trailer do justice to this highly immersive documentary that follows a nocturnal commercial fishing trip in the North Atlantic. A refreshing contrast to contemporary documentaries that often rely on gimmicks to keep your attention. As someone that struggles with experimental cinema (purely from an attention standpoint), Leviathan captured me in a way that I hadn’t been in years - as if I was uncomfortably watching the remnants of my own scattered memories of a reality that wasn’t mine.