• The Saphead

    The Saphead

    ★★★½

    The Saphead while not Keaton’s most nuanced, fulfilling or important feature film, it still remains an uplifting one, showcasing his impeccable electrifying screen presents. Even if the comedy feels concealed for a lengthy time. (Supported by a glorious rewarding third act.) Buster Keaton’s first feature that came out in 1920 film is one he stared in but did not direct or have much involvement in the script, so naturally the film does fall into rather dull territory at times but…

  • Pink Flamingos

    Pink Flamingos

    ★★★★

    Pink flamingos while not John Waters’ grandest achievement in story pacing (Female Trouble, Multiple Maniacs) The film is much more than just shock value, under all the grotesque imagery, innuendos and notorious stomach turning moments it has monumental importance to cinema. Breaking barriers of cinema itself, showcasing raw talent, launching Divine into popular media and having genuine, heartfelt messages. The rebellious edge, political undertones, overacting, sensation performances, sexual fetishes, iconic speeches are all a combination of Water’s determination to bring…

  • Execution in Autumn

    Execution in Autumn

    ★★★★

    Execution in autumn is an exquisite analyse of accepting fate told through remarkable cinematography, portrayals of relentless desperation and authentic period sets. Director Lee Hsing has exceptional control here letting the audience firmly know the tone, characterizations of prisoners straight away in a speechless opening segment before the blood red titles appear. The first frame of a man shot overhead, strutting back and forth in a desolate wooden cell being shackled tightly on wrist & heels instantly created unease. Rattling of…

  • Turning Red

    Turning Red

    ★★★★

    Turning Red’s vibrant world, sharp animation, superb characters and stellar comedy surprised me at its approach to this particular story, of which I’ve seen many times previously. Diverting from the typical Pixar trend of trying to make its audience cry turning red is simply a riveting story about embracing your inner self, acknowledging your flaws and improving yourself. Let’s firstly talk about the red panda in the room here the controversy of the film, I found it to be utterly…

  • Outside the Law

    Outside the Law

    ★★★★½

    Outside the Law is a genuine treat to witness as all events play out unexpected ways in many flavourful performances. Lon Chaney magnetising effect on the viewer is so evident here more than ever in a sublime double role. The supporting cast, pacing, setting of Chinatown are fantastic in a murky background that oozes that hard hitting early 20s feel. A groundbreaking step in cinema for 1920 bringing the gangster genre into a new direction, adding psychological elements to the…

  • Vampyr

    Vampyr

    ★★★★★

    Vampyr is superbly directed by the monumentally important Carl Theodor Dreyer who previously crafted one of the greatest achievements in cinema history with the Passion of Joan of arc. Shot mostly in close ups and his features often tackle harsh realities of humanity aided by impeccable performances such as Day of Wrath, man of the house and Michael (His Silent film work) When entering into talkies starting with Vampyr but this feature is different from the Ordet & Gertrud (His late…

  • Vampyr

    Vampyr

    ★★★★★

    new reviews coming soon for Vampyr and more

  • Satantango

    Satantango

    ★★★★★

    Film Critic Danny Kay full in depth Review of Bela Tarr‘s Masterwork Sátántangó (1994) I paused the film every 5- 10 minutes to review (I wrote 22 pagers, almost 15,000 words.) taking weeks of writing, editing and watching this unrelenting seven hours breaking down its symbolism, themes and imagery of manifesting philosophy. (Every second was worth it) The loss purity, honesty, guilt, religion, fetishes, nihilism are the core elements running throughout the feature showing a difficult to stomach depiction of…

  • Satantango

    Satantango

    Full in depth review by film critic Danny Kay coming soon ..... full 7 hour review

  • Encanto

    Encanto

    ★★★★

    Encanto's perception of individuality, crumbling under the immense pressure of your gifts is explored in the vivid, cultural manifestation of imagination. The burden is hidden at first seeming like a paradise of heavenly humility only to find one member has been disregarded by the family's self-indulgence. Isabella at first comes off as obnoxious but the feature often tricks our mind into jading someone before their inner feelings or back-story. The delirium-like visuals help the musical interactions so well transporting the…

  • The Men

    The Men

    ★★★★

    Marlon Brando has arrived to change cinema in “the men“a multiplex relashonship of human struggle in an unflinching adaption. Imagine you can't use your legs, and how that would impact your mental health, every minute detail is explored here showing the daily struggles of a young, handsome man deprived of his ambitious life. We not only see the disability affect himself but the friends, lovers, and hospital staff around him. The reward of fighting for war in Ken’s eyes is…

  • Charulata

    Charulata

    ★★★★★

    Charulata is delicately characterized by an unrushed storyline that's absent of ever feeling weighed down by its dreary themes. I was relishing Madhabi Mukherjee's performance and was in awe when she sings Rabindranath. Madhabi displays every emoting expression, having an astounding gaze that felt like she was hypnotically enhancing the screen. Demonstrating the world was tumbling down around her. The feature tells a rendition of a subtle feminist perspective in the depressing political landscape that is often broken up by…