Ingmar Bergman

Having finished all 44 of his feature films, I can say Bergman speaks my language. He gets at things that matter to me most, and does it in the most uncompromising, soul-searching of ways.

Disillusioned by religion, he always found a way to translate religious mythology into the language of existential-humanist philosophy. This is big for me, especially when so few spiritual filmmakers can effectively tow the line between faith and doubt, belief and disbelief, without pandering to one side over the other.

I'd never classify him as a religious filmmaker per se, but I would say he really understands how religious yearning can be cinematically reborn into a new secularized context, free of sentiment and creedal baggage. 

His films…

  • Autumn Sonata

    1

  • Fanny and Alexander

    2

  • Cries and Whispers

    3

  • Winter Light

    4

  • Persona

    5

  • The Virgin Spring

    6

  • Sawdust and Tinsel

    7

  • Scenes from a Marriage

    8

  • Summer with Monika

    9

  • Summer Interlude

    10

  • The Seventh Seal

    11

  • Shame

    12

  • Saraband

    13

  • Face to Face

    14

  • To Joy

    15

  • Wild Strawberries

    16

  • Through a Glass Darkly

    17

  • The Silence

    18

  • The Magician

    19

  • After the Rehearsal

    20

  • Brink of Life

    21

  • Waiting Women

    22

  • Hour of the Wolf

    23

  • Dreams

    24

  • Music in Darkness

    25

  • The Rite

    26

  • It Rains on Our Love

    27

  • The Serpent's Egg

    28

  • Port of Call

    29

  • Crisis

    30

  • Prison

    31

  • A Lesson in Love

    32

  • From the Life of the Marionettes

    33

  • The Passion of Anna

    34

  • The Devil's Eye

    35

  • Thirst

    36

  • The Magic Flute

    37

  • The Touch

    38

  • Smiles of a Summer Night

    39

  • The Blessed Ones

    40

  • In the Presence of a Clown

    41

  • A Ship to India

    42

  • All These Women

    43

  • This Can't Happen Here

    44