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  • Wait Until Dark

    Wait Until Dark

    ★★★

    Even if her true era was the '50s, Audrey Hepburn had a good year in '67, what with this and Two for the Road. She's very good as a young blind woman who proves more resourceful than anyone imagined in this gripping and entertaining thriller, based on a Broadway suspense play by Frederick Knott. It's got entertaining supporting performances from Richard Crenna, Julie Herrod as a smart young girl from (it's intimated) a dysfunctional family, and especially Alan Arkin as the head baddie. They do a lot with essentially one set. Terence Young was otherwise known for Dr. No and From Russia With Love.

  • A Gentle Woman

    A Gentle Woman

    ★★★½

    Rohmer had wanted to make this adaptation of the Dostoyevsky tale about a suicidal wife, set in modern Paris, but Bresson was the one who got to it. He was in his late sixties when he made this film and if anything his literary, underplayed, transcendental style is more hypnotic than ever.

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  • The Beaches of Agnès

    The Beaches of Agnès

    ★★★★★

    I am bursting with love for this film. It's everything I love; everything life and cinema should be: Paris, the left, music, love, creativity. This is a formally inventive look back on Agnes Varda's great, long life and career (and she is still going strong). My love for it overflows, gushes into this box, this container to fill with words. I felt tears of joy sting my face when, towards the end, I beheld the "house of cinema."

  • Last Train Home

    Last Train Home

    ★★★★

    This documentary puts us in the shoes of the human beings behind "made in China." It's a universal story, the generation gap, this one set against a backdrop of the world's largest human migration: 130 million migrant workers, who have moved from the countryside to seek work in the city in factories, go home once a year for Chinese New Year. Most of us in the west will never get as deep into China as this film takes us, even…