Aki Red

21  |  DLS-CSB  |  filmmaker

Favorite films

  • Mulholland Drive
  • Kisapmata
  • Chungking Express
  • Cemetery of Splendor

Recent activity

All
  • Where Is My Friend's House?

    ★★★★

  • Certified Copy

    ★★★★½

  • Pig

    ★★★½

  • Saving Private Ryan

    ★★★★½

Recent reviews

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  • Where Is My Friend's House?

    Where Is My Friend's House?

    ★★★★

    Begins with a door pushed gently by the wind, a force of nature. Something might be wrong with its locking mechanism. 

    Ends with a door pushed harshly by the wind, a force of nature. Something is definitely wrong with its mechanism. 

    And we all began as children, innately good, until circumstances lead us to these doors. We discover the harsh realities of society, and realize there are no ways to close these doors anymore. We eventually conform, until our innocence is forever stolen by these broken mechanisms.

  • Certified Copy

    Certified Copy

    ★★★★½

    I admire how challenging it’s narrative structure becomes, and not in a showy, in your face challenging type of way. It’s more in the vein of Kieslowski’s The Double Life of Veronique, in which one will feel the grasp of what Kiarostami is aiming for through its absorbing naturalism, without a necessary focus on coherence or logic.

    In the end, the experience of watching the film is not really about rationalizing the story, but instead,  letting oneself be moved by its…

Popular reviews

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  • Apocalypse Child

    Apocalypse Child

    ★★★★

    Wonderfully made, richly interwoven character study about adults coming to terms with their neglected childhoods.

    The film captures Baler in all its beauty, and what’s special for me is how it is so well-integrated to the film’s storytelling. Surfing is used as a metaphor for life — learning to go along with the waves, and eventually learning to go against it. There are different layers of storytelling here which fleshes out the psyche of these characters. Mario Cornejo has a…

  • Annette

    Annette

    ★★★★

    Through all its provocations and visual exuberance, Annette manages to create a vivid portrait of the entertainment industry in the contemporary era. How it creates demons out of men, eventually causing an individual’s irreversible downfall. 

    However, Carax’s provocative style works more towards eccentricity than poetic fluidity. The film stands out best when absorbed as individual moments, but less so and less coherently as a whole.

    Nevertheless, Adam Driver’s performance is phenomenal, and I could definitely listen to Baby Annette’s hymns all day long.  

    This is one unique musical. Having films as crazy as this made from time to time provides a breath of fresh air.